Training Effect

By Alex Hoffmann on May, 25 2020

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Alex Hoffmann

Dr. Alex Hoffmann is the President of the College of Exercise Science. He earned a doctorate in Sports Management from the United States Sports Academy, a master's degree in kinesiology from California State University, Fullerton, and a bachelor's degree in exercise science from Central College. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Hoffmann worked as Master Fitness Trainer course instructor for the United States Army, and as a strength and conditioning coach, personal trainer, and nutritionist.

Physical activity stimulates a series of metabolic responses that affect the body’s anatomy, physiology, and bio-chemical makeup.

Physical activity imposes stress on your body. As a result of the increased stress placed on your muscles and other bodily tissues, your body undergoes muscular, cardiopulmonary, and metabolic adaptations – this is known as the “training effect.” Your body begins to change at the cellular level and allows more energy to be released with less oxygen. Your heart and capillaries become stronger and more dispersed in order to allow a more efficient flow of oxygen and nutrients. Your muscles, tendons, and bones accommodate to the activity so that you get better at doing it. Eventually, your body releases unnecessary fat from its frame, and your stride and gait become more efficient. Your resting heart rate and blood pressure drop.

Back to main Blog
Alex Hoffmann

Dr. Alex Hoffmann is the President of the College of Exercise Science. He earned a doctorate in Sports Management from the United States Sports Academy, a master's degree in kinesiology from California State University, Fullerton, and a bachelor's degree in exercise science from Central College. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Hoffmann worked as Master Fitness Trainer course instructor for the United States Army, and as a strength and conditioning coach, personal trainer, and nutritionist.

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